Daily Archives: June 4, 2021

Derek’s Birding This Week (including Monhegan Island), 5/28-6/4/2021

My annual Monhegan Spring Migration Weekend Tour report, including species lists, can be found here:

Back on the mainland, my observations of note over the past seven days included the following:

  • 2 Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Green Point WMA, Dresden, 6/1 (with Jeannette).
  • 1 LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, Hedgehog Mountain Park, Freeport, 6/2. Surprising and out of place in a seasonal stream in the deep woods. My 152nd Patch Bird for the Hedgehog complex.
  • 1 Red Crossbill, Otter Brook Preserve, Harpswell, 6/3 (with clients from Maine).
  • Handful of passage migrants around Biddeford Pool on 6/4 including a female MOURNING WARBLER (FOY) and an immature male Bay-breasted Warbler.

And FYI, we still have some room on Monday’s mini-pelagic out of Boothbay Harbor! Come join me! All the details, as well as reservation information, is here: https://www.freeportwildbirdsupply.com/pelagics

2021 Spring Monhegan Migration Weekend

Hmm…how do I spin this one? Well, it could have been colder, and it could have been a lot wetter. The crossbills were pretty amazing, and it was fun to find that Purple Martin. 

But yes, as far as Monhegan Spring Migration Weekends go, this was a pretty slow and cold one.  In fact, the 77 total species and only 10 species of warblers were both record lows (in 10 years of doing these trips on the last weekend of May).  But it is not spin to say a slow day of birding on Monhegan is better than a great day of birding most everywhere else.

The very early spring this year had rapidly advanced vegetation. On many of our Memorial Day weekends, apple trees – one of the most important bird-magnets out here – are not yet blooming. This year, they were just about finished.  Meanwhile, the dry and benign weather of the past few weeks have allowed migrant birds to proceed unimpeded. They were either going right overhead or stopping on the island only briefly before continuing onward. No traffic jams of birds held up by unfavorable weather, no concentrations at few and isolated foodstuffs, and certainly no fallouts. Well, at least the abnormally dry conditions we have been experiencing began to break this weekend.

More importantly, while the above complaints made for slow birding, they really made for a great migration for birds who don’t want to get stuck on an island or other migrant trap. Instead, they got to where they needed to go and many seemed to get right to work in order to catch up with the advanced season.

When we arrived on Friday, we found relatively few birds as expected given the preceding week’s beautiful weather. We quickly caught up with the pair of Blue-winged Teal that have been hanging around and possibly breeding out here – a very good bird on offshore islands. I was also happy to finally see my first Tennessee Warblers of the spring. And while diversity was not overly high, it was really nice out and we enjoyed really good looks at a lot of what we encountered, including the aforementioned Tennessee Warblers, Blackburnian Warblers, and our daily dose of the confiding and stunning Scarlet Tanager that was lingering around the village’s south end.

(Photos above: Scarlet Tanager, Tennessee Warbler, and Cedar Waxwing).

I had really high hopes for Saturday morning. With very light southerly winds and partly cloudy skies at dusk (I enjoyed a Common Nighthawk and an American Woodcock while watching the sunset with a friend), the winds became very light southwesterly after dark.  Then, around 2:00am, some light rain began to fall, and the winds shifted to the northeast.  The hopes for a fallout kept me awake as I listened to those first showers in the early morning hours.

Upon sunrise, it soon became clear that my hopes and dreams had been dashed. There was minimal bird movement visible on the NEXRAD radar before the rain arrived. A large area of low pressure passing to our south, with the northern edge of rain moving much further north than forecast, suggested the possibility of fallout conditions. But were there even any birds on the move before the rain? Or, were they cut off to our south by the approaching storm? Or – as we have been surmising on the mainland as well – have they just mostly passed by already?.

Light rain continued for our pre-breakfast walk, and it was very slow. There was definitely not a fallout, and there did not seem to be many birds around at all.  That Scarlet Tanager stole the show again though. Great looks at things like Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, American Redstart, and Northern Parula soon followed.

Rain slowly tapered off during the morning, and while cameras were mostly sealed away, it was more than birdable. We heard a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (my first of the year), a Virginia Rail, and even briefly saw the vociferous Sora that incessantly called from the marsh throughout the weekend.  Then, just before lunch, we found a female Purple Martin. Unexpectedly late, and rare out here in general, this was a nice find, and when we relocated it at Swim Beach, we had some great views to make sure it was indeed a Purple Martin.

The afternoon was dry, but the birding remained slow. We did get a better view of the dapper male Blue-winged Teal, and spent some real quality time with the flock of 18 Red Crossbills that contained a single White-winged Crossbill.  Many folks got one, if not two, life birds in this flock, and we saw them as well as one could ever hope.

With a light northeasterly wind overnight, little to no migration was detected on the radar Saturday night into Sunday morning, but it was not yet raining. It was a little birdier than the day before, but the pre-breakfast walk only yielded two new species for us: a fleeting glimpse of a Lincoln’s Sparrow and a fly-by American Black Duck.  But the crossbills entertained us once again! Also, Smooth Green Snake and Redbelly Snake side-by-side.

A large area of low pressure was rapidly developing off the mid-Atlantic coast, and the rain was heading our way. So we were grateful for another dry – albeit chilly – morning.  A couple of late Bobolinks and a Merlin were new for us, and we glimpsed a less-than-cooperative Short-billed Dowitcher that had arrived and played hard to get for the next couple of days. With so little shorebird habitat out here, most shorebirds are noteworthy, even species common on the mainland. According to Brett Ewald, this was only the 16th record for the island, and 10th for spring. In fact, this was my 218th species on Monhegan! Even on a slow day, you never know what might show up out here. 

Light rain had arrived by the time we regrouped after lunch and the northeasterly wind was picking up. We called it quits as the rain picked up in earnest around 3:00pm, retiring to our respective rooms – or, mostly, heated common areas – and got some reading and relaxation time in.

Overnight rain ended just about as our pre-breakfast walk got underway on Monday, with only light showers and a little drizzle for the next couple of hours. Given the forecast, this was most definitely a win. We checked gull roosts and other sheltered harbor nooks, turning up only a Savannah Sparrow as a new addition to our list. The rest of the morning was spent enjoying some of the birds we have been seeing for the past days, like the Blue-winged Teal and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker.

(Above: immature male American Redstart, adult male Ring-necked Pheasant, and THE adult male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker).

After the weekend tempest, those of us who survived were rewarded with calm, following seas for our ride back to New Harbor. It was foggy, but we had some great sightings on the easy ride back with single fly-by Razorbill, Atlantic Puffin, and a feeding Bonaparte’s Gull. Adding these three excellent birds helped our paltry list to a total of 77 species. With a long-term average of about 95 species in four days, you can see that we really did have a weekend of low avian diversity.

So alas, the weekend came to a close. A few good birds, lots of great looks at regular birds, and a few lingering chills. But, as usual, we ate well. Perhaps too well. But hey, we were burning off calories thermoregulating! Hey it happens, and the regulars all know that there will be a “bad” weekend once in a while to make the “best” tours that much sweeter.

Read

Since folks who have been reading several years of these trip reports, I figured I would include the gratuitous food porn photo as usual. However, without the Novelty open, there was no pizza. Besides, we like to class it up once in a while, in this case, at the Island Inn.

(* denotes seen from the ferry only. **Seen only by the leader outside of group time)

5/285/295/305/31
BLUE-WINGED TEAL2211
American Black Duck0010
Mallardxxxx
Common Eiderxxxx
White-winged Scoter1*000
Ring-necked Pheasant3468
Mourning Dove10888
Common Nighthawk1**000
Ruby-throated Hummingbird1000
Virginia Rail0110
Sora1110
Black Guillemotxxxx
ATLANTIC PUFFIN0001*
Razorbill0001*
American Woodcock1**000
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER0010
Bonaparte’s Gull0001*
Laughing Gullx* + 2221+ 14*
Herring Gullxxxx
Great Black-backed Gullxxxx
Common Ternx*006*
Northern Gannet1*120
Double-crested Cormorantxxxx
Great Cormorant1001
Osprey1000
Bald Eagle2210
Sharp-shinned Hawk2000
Red-bellied Woodpecker1100
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker0111
Merlin0011
Eastern Wood-Pewee5011
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher0100
Alder Flycatcher0201
“Traill’s” Flycatcher1000
Least Flycatcher0010
Eastern Kingbird4020
Red-eyed Vireo4122
Blue Jay44104
American Crowxxxx
Common Raven1110
PURPLE MARTIN0100
Tree Swallow2211
Barn Swallow0210
Black-capped Chickadee2xxx
Winter Wren0010
Carolina Wren0001
Golden-crowned Kinglet0211
American Robinxxxx
Gray Catbirdxxxx
Brown Thrasher0014
European Starlingxxxx
Cedar Waxwing40604030
Purple Finch1213
RED CROSSBILL18181818
WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL1111
American Goldfinch810128
Chipping Sparrow4222
White-throated Sparrow0001
Savannah Sparrow0001
Song Sparrowxxxx
Lincoln’s Sparrow0010
Black-and-white Warbler0112
Common Yellowthroat6101215
American Redstart0330
Northern Parula0233
Magnolia Warbler0132
Blackburnian Warbler2000
Yellow Warbler10868
Chestnut-sided Warbler2101
Blackpoll Warbler4886
Black-throated Green Warbler0121
Scarlet Tanager1111
Northern Cardinal6866
Bobolink0020
Red-winged Blackbird10101010
Common Gracklexxxx
Baltimore Oriole2222
Day Total51505652
4-DAY TOTAL77